Carolina Tiger Rescue

Katelyn Baity uses the head from a tiger costume to intrigue and entertain the big cats at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on July 23, 2020. While the enclosures are spacious, they are not comparable to the tigers’ natural environment, so the animals require additional enrichment to stave off boredom and to encourage exercise.
Intern Sarah Sessoms lugs thermoses of frozen enrichment treats between enclosures at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on July 23, 2020. While the Rescue has a strong roster of over 200 volunteers, quarantine and social distance requirements have meant that the bulk of the workload now falls on a very small contingent of staff and interns.
Tasha Tiger reclines on a platform in the trees in her enclosure in Pittsboro, NC on June 12, 2020. Green shade is an important consideration when the staff plans and prepares enclosures for the rescued animals.
Wendy Kinkajou, the oldest inhabitant of the Carolina Tiger Rescue, gazes at visitors through the fence that encloses her living space in Pittsboro, NC on June 12, 2020. Born in 1988, Wendy was eventually surrendered by her owner and now lives safely at the sanctuary.
Mary Day carefully offers a treat containing medicine to one of the tigers at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on July 23, 2020. The staff at the Rescue trains the animals to present themselves for visual inspection and to accept medications by using methods that are focused on safe distancing.
Additional caretakers stand by as intern Katelyn Baity prepares to feed a kinkajou at the Carolina Tiiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on June 12, 2020. Face masks are worn constantly throughout the sanctuary, not just to prevent transmission of the coronavirus between people, but also because the big cats are susceptible to Covid-19.
Maryssa Hill, Volunteer Coordinator at Carolina Tiger Rescue, greets one of the sanctuary’s residents from a safe distance at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on June 12, 2020. All visitors are kept a minimum of 3′ from the fences to ensure a safe environment, and no one, including staff, enters an inhabited enclosure .
Katelyn Baity carefully tracks the location of a kinkajou as she deposits its evening meal into a food slot at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on June 12, 2020. While small, kinkajou have long claws and sharp teeth, and extreme caution is taken by the staff and volunteers when interacting with them
Intern Sarah Sessoms prepares to drop a frozen “blood apple” into an enclosure at the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro, NC on July 23, 2020. The apples are a treat provided to the cats as part of the organization’s enrichment program.

Learn more about the Carolina Tiger Rescue.

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Photo Credit: Bisi Cameron Yee and Activate Good’s ‘Look for the Helpers’ Photojournalism Project (See the entire collection at ActivateGood.org/Helpers)

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